Groesbeek, view of the 'National Liberation Museum 1944-1945' in Groesbeek. © Ton Kersten
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Archive for October 2012

Ode to the Haggis

2012-10-26 (129) by Ton Kersten, tagged as humor

Hendrik Jan Thomassen not only sent me the tail of Haggis hunting but also a nice ancient poem as an ode to Haggis.

Here it is:

The haggis season has begun
and all over Scotland every gun
Is taken down with loving care
Though some prefer the haggis snare
The haggis are a wiley lot
That's why they are so seldom shot

Then hidden in the highland heather
Great hairy Clansmen crouch together
And having laid the haggis bait,
a life-like haggis on a plate,
One cries out loudly: ''There's the noo''
Which means the haggis are in view

It's flying upside down and low
The guns all fore but they're too slow
For thought it's rather old and fat
They're awful hard to hit like that

And as it flies off into the mist
Great hairy clansmen shake their fists
Scream their curseds to the crags
Stamp on empty haggis bags
And so the haggis get away
to live until next Christmas day
''Come back haggis''

And that's the reason it is so rare
This strange traditional Scottish fare

We're that haggis hi hooray
It's hog'manay not Christmas day

How to hunt the Haggis

2012-10-22 (128) by Ton Kersten, tagged as humor

Most people are familiar with my love of Scotland, single malt and (of course) haggis. But most people do not have a clue what haggis is and when you tell them, they walk out in disgust.

But a colleague of mine found out that haggis is just an animal that can be hunted in the Scottish Highlands.

This is how it's done:

.....asked me how the haggis were hunted so I explained that there were two types of haggis, who, because they lived on the steep slopes of the Scottish Highlands, developed legs of different lengths on their left and right sides depending upon which way they travelled round the mountain to graze. With the knowledge of which type of haggis one was hunting, the procedure was quite simple.

A large 'catch fence' was erected around the base of the mountain and a piper was sent up the mountain to play his bagpipes while walking contrary to the normal direction of rotation of the haggis. This put the fear of G*d in to the wee creatures who tried to run away, but of course their short legs were now down-hill so they soon overbalanced and rolled down the mountain into the catch fence at the base where they were then easily caught and euthanized.

Thanks to Hendrik Jan Thomassen.

Resize a partition

2012-10-19 (127) by Ton Kersten, tagged as sysadm

I often have to increase the size of a virtual disk on a virtual machine. But I always seem to forget how to do it. I guess I have done it over a 100 times and I cannot remember exactly how I did it. So this blog entry is to help people on how to do this and as a reminder to myself.

This example is done on a virtual machine with CentOS 6, but it can be done on every Linux. And in the fdisk examples I have left out some of the not to interesting lines.

Oke, here we go:

First, shut down your virtual machine and increase the disk size. Then start your virtual machine and go to the console. Now you have a virtual machine with a new disk size, but the current partition table needs to be adjusted to the new disk size. I know it’s possible with parted, but I always seem to end up on systems where it’s not available. So I just use fdisk.

# fdisk /dev/sda

Now give the p command, which prints the partition table and make a note of the start cylinder of the Linux LVM partition. This is the partition we are going to increase.

Please be very careful This trick only works if the partition you want to resize is at the end of the disk and contains a logical volume type system.

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/sda: 17.2 GB, 17179869184 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1          64      512000   83  Linux
/dev/sda2              65        2089    16264192   8e  Linux LVM

Delete the LVM partition (we will recreate this later)

Command (m for help): d
Partition number (1-5): 2

and create a new partition with the original starting point. The starting point should be the same, because all the partitions meta data is at the start of the partition.

Command (m for help): n
Command action
   e   extended
   p   primary partition (1-4)
Partition number (1-4): 2

And fill in the start cylinder of the LVM partition we deleted above

First cylinder (1-25600, default 1): 65
Last cylinder, +cylinders or +size{K,M,G} (65-25600, default 25600):
Using default value 25600

and change the type to Linux LVM

Command (m for help): t
Partition number (1-4): 2
Hex code (type L to list codes): 8e
Changed system type of partition 2 to 8e (Linux LVM)

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/sda: 26.8 GB, 26843545600 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           2          64      262144   83  Linux
/dev/sda2              65        2089    24567892   8e  Linux LVM

If you agree with the new layout, write it to disk with the w command and quit with q. If it’s not the disk disk with the root volume on it, it could be possible that you can skip the next reboot. Just a partprobe could do the trick.

# reboot

First it’s needed to resize physical volume.

# pvresize /dev/sda2

Make sure you know how much free space you now have

# vgdisplay

Make a note of the “LV Name” of the logical volume you want to resize

# lvdisplay

Resize the logical volume. I use gigabytes as an example here.

# lvresize -L +[Size]GB [LV Name]

Resize the file system on the logical volume.

# resize2fs [LV Name]