Groesbeek, view of the 'National Liberation Museum 1944-1945' in Groesbeek. © Ton Kersten
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Being bored

2010-10-22 (75) by Ton Kersten, tagged as humor

Every once in while everybody gets bored a bit. And what does a nerd/geek do when bored? Yes, he will write a bogus man page for some non-existing Linux feature.

Read my man page about the happy yes device.

The yes device

Appendix A: The "yes device" man page


yes - The yes device


The yes device (and it's ascendants) produces a constant flow of positive answers.

When called by it's descendant name /dev/yes.1 (the non-rewinding yes device), the positive answers will increase in positivity, from "yes", through "Yes" up to "YES" in a round-robin fashion.


The yes device can be used to start the day on a very positive basis. Some people do have a more negative attitude, but these are encouraged to use the /dev/no device.

If you are not completely sure what kind of day it will be, you can fall back to the /dev/maybe device.

For the /dev/no and the /dev/maybe device you can refer to their respective man pages.


The supported command line options for the yes device are:

Let the yes device produce case insensitive output
Quiet, no output will be produced. In fact this one is totally useless, but it keeps the system busy and beeps nicely at the end
Verbose, all output will be written to the verbose device
-t [seconds]
Outputs yes in seconds intervals. Defaults to 1 sec.
Pipe all output from /dev/yes right into /dev/kmem. (Only root can do this, as this requires write privileges on /dev/kmem) For further remarks, take a look at the -q option.





The master yes device
The non rewinding yes device
The secure yes device, nobody may read it, not even root
The random yes device, outputs random strings of yes
The ignore case yes device
The uppercase yes device
The lowercase yes device
The silent yes device
The inverted yes device, says yes and means no. This is mostly a link to /dev/no or to the woman device (/dev/woman)
The compressed yes device. Can be read by /dev/gzip.1 (the non-rewinding gzip device)
The color yes device. Non racist version, so can also be black
The choose color yes device. You can choose any color, as long as it's black
This is a POSIX 4.1 extension, making the yes device output the text i do
This is also a POSIX 4.1 extension, making the yes device output translucent words of yes
This is a POSIX 42 extension, meaning the yes device will resist outputting text, but this being a futile reaction

And any possible combination of the above, e.g.

The non-rewinding, random, black colored, secure, saying yes and meaning no yes device, a.k.a. /dev/idontknow.1


The exit codes of the yes device are completely bogus and are generated by the /dev/random device.


When the systems timezone is set to Moskva the /dev/ outputs the text "Njet". Be aware of this for security applications.